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Thursday, July 9, 2020

ARCHIVE REVIEW



2038: George Almore is working on a true human-equivalent AI. His latest prototype is ready. This sensitive phase is also the riskiest. Especially as he has a goal that must be hidden at all costs: being reunited with his dead wife.

Starring: Rhona Mitra, Theo James, and Toby Jones

Directed and written by: Gavin Rothery

   As society moves more into the future, technology continues to play a bigger role in our lives. One of the biggest things guiding us today are apps. It won’t be long before we move more to robots, which some basic forms already exist. Fast forward to 2038 in “Archive,” and a much more futuristic world with far advanced technology. Apps are definitely a thing of the past, as George Almore (Theo James) is already working on his third robot.
  The movie opens with an awesome looking base on the side of a mountain with a waterfall. It seems like it’s in the middle of nowhere, which might mean George is working on some top secret stuff. While his big project is hidden early on, the audience is introduced to the first two robots he’s built J-1 and J-2. J-1 is very basic, but can complete some tasks, while J-2 is more like his right hand robot. What’s different about J-2 is it seems to have a level of emotion to it, and maybe some memories. 
  Speaking of memories, they play a pretty big role in what’s happening. George has memories of his wife over the course of the movie. Some good, some bad, and some which apparently show what happened to the couple. The big project he’s working on is J-3, which is a robot that very closely mimics a human. Like the base, J-3 has a fantastic futuristic look after getting over its freaky first appearance. And the memories, well they are supposed to be put into J-3.  
  And how are memories going to end up in J-3? That’s where the Archive machine comes into play, as it’s a little unclear how it truly works. It somehow has some of a person’s thoughts saved for a time period after they are dead. Sounds crazy, but remember this is the future. George really isn’t supposed to be doing that, but it’s obvious he’s hurt by the loss of his wife, and wants her back any way he can take her. Of course messing with technology he isn’t supposed to is going to come with consequences, as the audience sees in the final stretch of the movie.
  This movie moves in stages, and introduces fancy technology all with the purpose of hiding something. It’s easy to get wrapped up in watching George interact with the robots in the beginning, and even focus on what J-2 is up to. Then there’s the random appearance by a few other characters that brings signs of danger that never really happens. All mixed in with memories showing George’s desire to be reunited with his wife at all costs. Ultimately, “Archive” tries to get the audience looking at everything else besides the twist that’s ready to punch them in the gut if they don’t see it coming. Nope, I was a sleep at the wheel and definitely got punched in the gut. Because it got me, I have to give it some credit and 3 pools of blood.
  
  HorrO

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

WHERE THE SCARY THINGS ARE EPISODE 53



Where The Scary Things Are Episode 53: 1BR With Naomi Grossman, David Marmor, and Alok Mishra

We welcome Director David Marmor, Producer Alok Mishra, and actress Naomi Grossman to the show as they present the new hit horror film 1BR. This is a must see film. Muse talks about Horror in Apartments in the Sinister 6. HorrO brings up the possibilities of remaking The Monster Squad and Chris gives us another stellar review of 1BR. MonsterMash does what he does best....Drinks Beer.

Check out our website www.wherethescarythingsare.com and send us an email on movies you want to hear about! KEEP IT SCARY MY FRIENDS!

Spotify spoti.fi/2O50xAk 



Tuesday, July 7, 2020

THE BEACH HOUSE REVIEW



A romantic getaway for two troubled college sweethearts turns into a struggle for survival when unexpected guests - and the surrounding environment - exhibit signs of a mysterious infection.

Starring: Liana Liberato, Noah Le Gros, and Jake Weber

Directed and written by: Jeffrey A. Brown

  Whether in real life or horror movies, it’s probably never a good idea to stay in an empty town. It might seem nice to have everything to yourself especially if you’re trying to rekindle some flames. However, sometimes things seem to be too good to be true, and this situation is one of them. In "The Beach House," the town is empty for a reason, and the few that come for a visit are in for a surprise.
  Emily (Liana Liberato) and Randall (Noah Le Gros) arrive at his father’s vacation house to find no one in sight. Randall is convinced people will come to town soon, but in the meantime the two should use the time to reconnect. It starts off just the way they want until Emily comes downstairs to find Jane (Maryann Nagel) sitting quietly at the kitchen table. Soon enough, she also gets to meet Jane’s husband Mitch (Jake Weber). The couple are friends of Randall’s father, and have apparently made themselves at home. 
  Emily, Randall, nor the audience get to know a whole lot about this couple, which works out well. Actually, keeping the story at four people, and giving just enough information about them works well in the strange events that begin to unfold. The most important thing to know about any of them is that Emily is about to finish her degree in Organic Chemistry and now take a dive into Astrobiology. The audience can take that as one of the few clues to what’s happening here along with the appearance of creatures like worms, and eating oysters for dinner.
  Yes, dinner where all the fun begins because Randall tries to get the couple to smoke his special stash with him. Things get odd outside, smoke rolls in, and people begin to feel weird. Is it the drugs or something else? A good question that takes some time to answer because things continue to be strange the next day with Mitch missing, Jane acting even weirder, and Randall not feeling great. Randall and Emily go to look for Mitch on the beach, and end up laying down for awhile. Randall still isn’t feeling great and has to return to the house, while Emily is about to experience quite a shock.
  The movie has been well paced to this point, and picks up at just the right speed down the stretch. A disgusting foot scene turns things gooey, wet, and sticky, while still maintaining its level of creepiness and strangeness. Things begin to change again going into the evening darkness with the fog rolling in once again. Unfortunately, Emily and Randall are about to find out why this town was empty when they got there. 
  “The Fog,” “The Thing,” a number of Lovecraft themed movies, any combination of them clearly can be found in “The Beach House." It also has a theme of eco-horror, which can found in another horror film set in the ocean “Sea Fever.” Regardless of where the idea came from, the movie has plenty going for it. It takes a beautiful setting, and creates an atmosphere that’s full of mystery, completely bizarre, and has an aura of impending doom over it. It’s perfectly paced, lays out just the right amount of clues,  and finishes things off with some great special effects to disgust the audience. With that, I’ll pass on the vacation to the beach house, and give this movie 3.5 pools of blood.

  HorrO

Monday, July 6, 2020

BELZEBUTH REVIEW



After losing his family in an extremely tragic way, Detective Ritter must investigate a massacre at a school perpetrated by a student. What seemed like a pretty clear case becomes much more dense when a priest of the Vatican appears with another point of view.

Starring: Tobin Bell, Tate Ellington, and Joaquin Cosio

Directed by: Emilio Portes

Written by: Luis Carlos Fuentes, and Emilio Portes

  Child birth can come with a mixed bag of emotions, and certainly pain for the mother. After it’s over the the joy sets in before the mother hands over her child to basically strangers to be checked out. In most cases, nothing goes wrong, the hospital takes care of the child, and it eventually goes home with mom. However, there’s lots that can go wrong like the baby being sick, or getting names switched. Detective Ritter (Joaquin Cosio) is about to experience something even worse in “Belzebuth.”
  His wife has just given birth to a child, and the couple seems like they couldn’t be happier. While waiting to see their child, Ritter gets called away leaving his wife in the hospital. Their baby isn’t sick, its not about to be switched, but something horrific is about to happen. The nurses change shifts, and the new nurse seems to have evil in her eyes. She locks the room with several babies in it, and proceeds to stab them all before taking her life as well.
  This will certainly get the audience’s attention, but that’s not the end of it. Five years later, life has changed a lot for the detective. It’s been a struggle to get to this point, and he’s about to be thrown into the case of his life. A school shooting has just taken place, and he must find out why. While he tries to find out if something is wrong with the kid killer, he soon finds out there’s something much bigger at play. 
  Another team has been sent to investigate the shooting, but from another angle. While at first resisting his help, Ritter gives Ivan (Tate Ellington) a chance to make his case for something spiritual being at work. They put some pieces together as more tragic events occur. Obviously these events have driven the first half of the movie, but a lot changes when they investigate a church. Get ready to be creeped out by Jesus like never before. 
  A third person joins the party, former priest Vasilio Canetti (Tobin Bell). He’s been around the entire time, but now he’s the key to putting an end to it all. All the tragedy leads to a battle of good vs evil, and an exorcism in an underground tunnel. It’s a wild scene with twists, deaths, sacrifice, and a dramatic ending. Each of these three characters seem to fulfill their destinies along with a couple of others.
  “Belzebuth” certainly has the devil at work. There’s been movies with tragic events happening, but this one might take the cake. It starts off with what might be the worst of all killing off a room full of newborns. As the audience braces itself for the next event, an interesting religious plot unfolds. Many lives are lost, but a few important ones come full circle by the end. This movie will definitely shock audiences, and try to creep them out. The devil inside me says to give it 3.5 pools of blood.

  HorrO

Friday, July 3, 2020

BOAR REVIEW



In the harsh, yet beautiful Australian outback lives a beast, an animal of staggering size, with a ruthless, driving need for blood and destruction. It cares for none, defends its territory with brutal force, and kills with a raw, animalistic savagery unlike any have seen before.

Starring: Nathan Jones, Bill Moseley, and John Jarratt

Directed by: Chris Sun

Written by: Kirsty Dallas and Chris Sun

Check out the video below and find out how many pools of blood it received...

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